Artery Research

Volume 12, Issue C, December 2015, Pages 8 - 8

P2.10 EXAGGERATED EXERCISE BLOOD PRESSURE INDEPENDENTLY PREDICTS INCIDENT HYPERTENSION: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS

Authors
Martin Schultz*, Petr Otahal, Dean Picone, James Sharman
Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
Available Online 23 November 2015.
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2015.10.216How to use a DOI?
Abstract

Background: Exaggerated exercise blood pressure (EEBP) independently predicts cardiovascular (CV) events and mortality, but reasons underlying this increased CV risk are unclear. The association between an EEBP and incident hypertension (as a potential underlying risk factor) has been reported, but there has never been a pooled summary of risk estimates (RE). The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies assessing the association between EEBP and incident hypertension among normotensive individuals.

Methods: Seven online databases were searched for studies that measured dynamic exercise BP and rates of incident hypertension (defined from clinic BP ≥140/90 mmHg or out of clinic BP above guideline recommended values) among people who were normotensive at baseline. EEBP was defined as systolic BP during exercise (moderate or peak intensity), as well as the change from rest, or in acute recovery after exercise.

Results: 22 studies met inclusion criteria, totalling 31,130 participants aged 42.4 ± 8.9 years followed for 6.0 ± 2.6 years. Pooled meta-analysis at peak and moderate exercise intensity, adjusted for baseline (rest) BP, age, sex and other traditional CV risk factors revealed that an EEBP significantly increased the risk for incident in-clinic hypertension (peak RE=1.52 [95% CI: 0.99, 2.33], I2=80.4%; moderate RE=1.90 [95% CI: 1.11, 3,28], I2=75.5%).

Conclusions: An EEBP independently predicts incident hypertension, thus indicating that clinicians supervising exercise stress testing should consider additional patient follow-up with respect to BP control and lifestyle intervention to reduce CV risk among patients with EEBP.

Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC license.

Journal
Artery Research
Volume-Issue
12 - C
Pages
8 - 8
Publication Date
2015/11
ISSN (Online)
1876-4401
ISSN (Print)
1872-9312
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2015.10.216How to use a DOI?
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC license.

Cite this article

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Martin Schultz*
AU  - Petr Otahal
AU  - Dean Picone
AU  - James Sharman
PY  - 2015
DA  - 2015/11
TI  - P2.10 EXAGGERATED EXERCISE BLOOD PRESSURE INDEPENDENTLY PREDICTS INCIDENT HYPERTENSION: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS
JO  - Artery Research
SP  - 8
EP  - 8
VL  - 12
IS  - C
SN  - 1876-4401
UR  - https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2015.10.216
DO  - https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2015.10.216
ID  - Schultz*2015
ER  -