Part of Springer Nature

Artery Research

Volume 12, Issue C, December 2015, Pages 9 - 9

P2.15 IRRITABLE AFFECTIVE TEMPERAMENT IS A PREDICTOR OF PULSE WAVE VELOCITY, WHEREAS HYPERTHYMIC AFFECTIVE TEMPERAMENT DETERMINES AUGMENTATION INDEX IN CHRONIC HYPERTENSION

Authors
János Nemcsik*1, Andrea László1, Péter Torzsa1, Beáta Kőrösi1, Dániel Eörsy1, Orsolya Cseprekál2, András Tislér2, Zsófia Nemcsik-Bencze3, Xénia Gonda4, 5, Zoltán Rihmer4, 6
1Department of Family Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
2Ist Department of Internal Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
3Department of Radiology and Oncotherapy, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
4Department of Clinical and Theoretical Mental Health, Semmelweis University Budapest, Budapest, Hungary
5MTA-SE Neurochemistry Research Group, Budapest, Hungary
6Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
Available Online 23 November 2015.
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2015.10.221How to use a DOI?
Abstract

Background: Affective temperaments (anxious, depressive, cyclothymic, irritable and hyperthymic) are subclinical manifestations of major mood disorders and there is cumulating evidence about their involvement is somatic disorders as well. The aim of our study was to evaluate the associations of affective temperament scores with arterial stiffness parameters in hypertensive patients.

Methods: In this cross-sectional study, chronic, well-controlled hypertensive patients, with no history of depression, completed the TEMPS-A, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A) autoquestionnaires in three GP practices. Arterial stiffness was measured with the tonometric PulsePen device.

Results: Altogether 183 patients were involved. In regression analysis irritable temperament score was a predictor of pulse wave velocity (adjusted for age, brachial systolic blood pressure, onset of hypertension, serum glucose, GFR-EPI, BDI and HAM-A, β=0.170, p=0.031), whereas hyperthymic temperament score was a predictor of augmentation index (adjusted for age, gender, smoking, heart rate, BDI and HAM-A, β=−0.211, p=0.004).

Limitations: The cross-sectional design of the study precludes the evaluation of causality.

Conclusion: Our results suggest that high irritable temperament score might be a marker of increased, whereas high hyperthymic score a decreased cardiovascular risk among chronic hypertensive patients, however, follow-up studies are required to confirm this hypothesis. The evaluation of affective temperaments seems to be a potential tool to study psychosomatic processes.

Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC license.

Download article (PDF)
View full text (HTML)

Journal
Artery Research
Volume-Issue
12 - C
Pages
9 - 9
Publication Date
2015/11
ISSN (Online)
1876-4401
ISSN (Print)
1872-9312
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2015.10.221How to use a DOI?
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC license.

Cite this article

TY  - JOUR
AU  - János Nemcsik*
AU  - Andrea László
AU  - Péter Torzsa
AU  - Beáta Kőrösi
AU  - Dániel Eörsy
AU  - Orsolya Cseprekál
AU  - András Tislér
AU  - Zsófia Nemcsik-Bencze
AU  - Xénia Gonda
AU  - Zoltán Rihmer
PY  - 2015
DA  - 2015/11
TI  - P2.15 IRRITABLE AFFECTIVE TEMPERAMENT IS A PREDICTOR OF PULSE WAVE VELOCITY, WHEREAS HYPERTHYMIC AFFECTIVE TEMPERAMENT DETERMINES AUGMENTATION INDEX IN CHRONIC HYPERTENSION
JO  - Artery Research
SP  - 9
EP  - 9
VL  - 12
IS  - C
SN  - 1876-4401
UR  - https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2015.10.221
DO  - https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2015.10.221
ID  - Nemcsik*2015
ER  -