Artery Research

Volume 4, Issue 1, March 2010, Pages 19 - 23

The assessment of carotid–femoral distance for aortic pulse wave velocity: Should it be estimated from body height?☆

Authors
Jan Filipovský*, Otto Mayer, Milena Dolejšová, Jitka Seidlerová
Department of Internal Medicine II, Charles University Medical Faculty Pilsen, Czech Republic

The study was supported by the European Framework Programmes, Project LSHM-CT-2006-037093: Integrating Genomics, Clinical Research and Care in Hypertension (InGenious HyperCare), and Project HEALTH-2007-2.1.1-2: European Network for Genetic-Epidemiological Studies: building a method to dissect complex genetic traits, using essential hypertension as a disease model (HyperGenes).

*Corresponding author. Department of Internal Medicine II, Charles University Medical Faculty and Teaching Hospital Pilsen, E. Beneše 13, 305 99 Pilsen, Czech Republic. E-mail address: filipovsky@fnplzen.cz (J. Filipovský).
Corresponding Author
Jan Filipovský
Received 12 January 2009, Revised 12 January 2010, Accepted 18 January 2010, Available Online 10 February 2010.
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2010.01.002How to use a DOI?
Keywords
Pulse wave velocity, Carotid–femoral distance, Aortic stiffness
Abstract

Background: Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) can be biased by the measurement of carotid–femoral (c-f) distance on body surface. We wondered whether the estimation of distance according to body height could be used.

Methods: Three cohorts of altogether 596 subjects (mean age 58.9 years) were studied. PWV was measured by Sphygmocor. The c-f distance was 1. measured by tape, 2. estimated from height which was multiplied by 0.29 (=median ratio of measured c-f distance to body height).

Results: Difference in PWV calculated by the two methods (measured minus estimated) increased with PWV: in 10th decile (>12.88 m/s), it was on the average +0.8 m/s. In multiple regression analysis, this difference depended highly significantly on PWV, weight and male gender (positive associations) and height (negative association); there were no associations with age, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, or presence of cardiovascular disease.

Conclusions: The difference between measured and estimated value was mild even in subjects with the highest measured PWV and it was not influenced by the risk profile of the subjects. The estimated PWV values showed regression to the mean; this phenomenon could be due to lower precision of the estimation, but also due to false high measured values of the c-f distance in obese subjects. Estimation of c-f distance from body height would probably reduce bias due to body dysproportion. The best method of the distance assessment, however, must be determined in larger cohorts where the relationship to cardiovascular morbidity/mortality endpoints can be evaluated.

Copyright
© 2010 Association for Research into Arterial Structure and Physiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC license.

Download article (PDF)
View full text (HTML)

Journal
Artery Research
Volume-Issue
4 - 1
Pages
19 - 23
Publication Date
2010/02
ISSN (Online)
1876-4401
ISSN (Print)
1872-9312
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2010.01.002How to use a DOI?
Copyright
© 2010 Association for Research into Arterial Structure and Physiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC license.

Cite this article

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Jan Filipovský
AU  - Otto Mayer
AU  - Milena Dolejšová
AU  - Jitka Seidlerová
PY  - 2010
DA  - 2010/02
TI  - The assessment of carotid–femoral distance for aortic pulse wave velocity: Should it be estimated from body height?☆
JO  - Artery Research
SP  - 19
EP  - 23
VL  - 4
IS  - 1
SN  - 1876-4401
UR  - https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2010.01.002
DO  - https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2010.01.002
ID  - Filipovský2010
ER  -