Artery Research

In Press, Corrected Proof, Available Online: 20 February 2021

Birth Weight in Relation to Post-Natal Growth Patterns as Predictor of Arterial Stiffness and Central Hemodynamics in Young Adults from a Population-based Study

Authors
Johannes Sperling, Shantanu SharmaORCID, Peter M. Nilsson*, ORCID
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Internal Medicine Research Group, Jan Waldenströms gata 15, Floor 5, Malmö S-20502, Sweden
*Corresponding author. Email: Peter.Nilsson@med.lu.se
Corresponding Author
Peter M. Nilsson
Received 6 November 2020, Accepted 24 January 2021, Available Online 20 February 2021.
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2991/artres.k.210215.001How to use a DOI?
Keywords
Augmentation index, birth weight, central blood pressure, mismatch, pulse wave velocity
Abstract

Objective: Our aim was to examine the impact of mismatch patterns reflecting pre- and post-natal growth conditions on markers of arterial stiffness and central hemodynamics in young adults.

Methods: In all, 1056 participants from Malmö Offspring Study, 484 men and 572 women (age-range 18–44 years), were included. All participants were stratified into four subgroups based on low (≤0) or high (>0) Birth Weight z-score (BWz) and low (≤ median) or high (> median) Body Mass Index (BMI) at 20 years age (BMI20). All participants underwent carotid-femoral Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) measurement and pulse wave analysis with Sphygmocor. Additionally, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure data was recorded in a subgroup of 184 participants.

Results: Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP), central SBP (cSBP) and Diastolic Blood Pressure (DBP), and 24-h night-time SBP was higher (p < 0.001; p < 0.001; p = 0.04) in “low BWz/high BMI20” (mismatch group) compared with “low BWz/low BMI20” (reference). The mismatch phenotype was significantly associated with an increased risk of elevated brachial [odds ratio (OR), 2.78; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.94–3.98] and cSBP (OR, 2.0; CI: 1.38–2.91) in young adults. No differences were observed in PWV or augmentation pressure index in comparison between “low BWz/high BMI20” and “low BWz/low BMI20.”

Conclusion: Lower birth weight in combination with a higher attained BMI in young adult life, is associated with higher brachial SBP/DBP and central SBP/DBP. Therefore, children born with low birth weight should be protected from exaggerated catch-up growth to reduce their risk of adult hypertension, obesity, and adverse central hemodynamics.

HIGHLIGHTS

We aimed to examine the impact of mismatch patterns between pre- and post-natal growth conditions on markers of arterial stiffness and central hemodynamics in 1056 participants from a population-based study in Sweden, 484 men and 572 women in the age-range 18–44 years.

  • Lower birth weight was associated with higher Brachial DBP (bDBP), higher central SBP/DBP, and higher Aix.

  • Lower birth weight in combination with a higher attained BMI in young adult life (the mismatch phenotype) associates with higher bSBP/bDBP and higher central blood pressure.

  • We suggest an additive hemodynamic programming effect of weight gain during the two first decades of life following low birth weight.

Copyright
© 2021 The Authors. Publishing services by Atlantis Press International B.V.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

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Journal
Artery Research
Publication Date
2021/02
ISSN (Online)
1876-4401
ISSN (Print)
1872-9312
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2991/artres.k.210215.001How to use a DOI?
Copyright
© 2021 The Authors. Publishing services by Atlantis Press International B.V.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

Cite this article

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Johannes Sperling
AU  - Shantanu Sharma
AU  - Peter M. Nilsson
PY  - 2021
DA  - 2021/02
TI  - Birth Weight in Relation to Post-Natal Growth Patterns as Predictor of Arterial Stiffness and Central Hemodynamics in Young Adults from a Population-based Study
JO  - Artery Research
SN  - 1876-4401
UR  - https://doi.org/10.2991/artres.k.210215.001
DO  - https://doi.org/10.2991/artres.k.210215.001
ID  - Sperling2021
ER  -