Artery Research

Volume 4, Issue 1, March 2010, Pages 27 - 31

Carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity: Impact of different arterial path length measurements

Authors
Jun Sugawaraa, b, *, Koichiro Hayashib, Takashi Yokoib, Hirofumi Tanakaa
aCardiovascular Aging Research Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA
bInstitute for Human Science and Biomedical Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 6, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566, Japan
*Corresponding author. Institute for Human Science and Biomedical Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 6, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566, Japan. Tel.: +81 29 861 7138; fax: +81 29 861 6660. E-mail address: jun.sugawara@aist.go.jp (J. Sugawara).
Corresponding Author
Jun Sugawara
Received 17 September 2009, Revised 29 October 2009, Accepted 16 November 2009, Available Online 4 December 2009.
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2009.11.001How to use a DOI?
Keywords
Arterial stiffness, Applanation tonometory, Carotid artery
Abstract

Background: Carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) is the most established index of arterial stiffness. Yet there is no consensus on the methodology in regard to the arterial path length measurements conducted on the body surface. Currently, it is not known to what extent the differences in the arterial path length measurements affect absolute PWV values.

Methods: Two hundred fifty apparently healthy adults (127 men and 123 women, 19–79 years) were studied. Carotid–femoral PWV was calculated using (1) the straight distance between carotid and femoral sites (PWVcar–fem), (2) the straight distance between suprasternal notch and femoral site minus carotid arterial length (PWV(ssn–fem)−(ssn–car)), (3) the straight distance between carotid and femoral sites minus carotid arterial length (PWV(car–fem)−(ssn–car)), and (4) the combined distance from suprasternal notch to the umbilicus and from the umbilicus to femoral site minus carotid arterial length (PWV(ssn–umb–fem)−(ssn–car)).

Results: All the calculated PWV were significantly correlated with each other (r = 0.966–0.995). PWVs accounting for carotid arterial length were 16–31% lower than PWVcar–fem. PWVcar–fem value of 12 m/s corresponded to 8.3 m/s for PWV(ssn–fem)−(ssn–car), 10.0 m/s for PWV(car–fem)−(ssn–car), and 8.9 m/s for PWV(ssn–umb–fem)−(ssn–car).

Conclusion: Different body surface measurements used to estimate arterial path length would produce substantial variations in absolute PWV values.

Copyright
© 2009 Association for Research into Arterial Structure and Physiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC license.

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Journal
Artery Research
Volume-Issue
4 - 1
Pages
27 - 31
Publication Date
2009/12
ISSN (Online)
1876-4401
ISSN (Print)
1872-9312
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2009.11.001How to use a DOI?
Copyright
© 2009 Association for Research into Arterial Structure and Physiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC license.

Cite this article

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Jun Sugawara
AU  - Koichiro Hayashi
AU  - Takashi Yokoi
AU  - Hirofumi Tanaka
PY  - 2009
DA  - 2009/12
TI  - Carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity: Impact of different arterial path length measurements
JO  - Artery Research
SP  - 27
EP  - 31
VL  - 4
IS  - 1
SN  - 1876-4401
UR  - https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2009.11.001
DO  - https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2009.11.001
ID  - Sugawara2009
ER  -