Artery Research

Volume 24, Issue C, December 2018, Pages 16 - 21

Peripheral blood flow regulation in response to sympathetic stimulation in individuals with down syndrome

Authors
Thessa I.M. Hilgenkamp*, Sang Ouk Wee1, Elizabeth C. Schroeder, Tracy Baynard, Bo Fernhall
Integrative Physiology Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1919 West Taylor Street, AHSB (MC 517), Chicago, IL, 60612, United States
1

Present address: California State University San Bernardino, 5500 University Parkway, San Bernardino CA 92407, CA, United States

*Corresponding author. University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, 1919 West Taylor Street, 502A AHSB (MC 517), Chicago, IL, 60612, United States. E-mail address: thessa@uic.edu (T.I.M. Hilgenkamp).
Corresponding Author
Thessa I.M. Hilgenkamp
Received 17 September 2018, Accepted 6 October 2018, Available Online 24 October 2018.
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2018.10.001How to use a DOI?
Keywords
Down syndrome, Blood flow, Sympathetic stimulus, Autonomic nervous system
Abstract

Background: Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) experience autonomic dysfunction, with reduced sympathetic and parasympathetic control. This results in alterations in resting heart rate and blood pressure and attenuated responses to sympathoexcitatory stimuli. It is unknown to what extent this impacts the regulation of peripheral blood flow in response to sympathetic stimuli, which is an important prerequisite to exercise and perform work. Therefore, we aimed to investigate differences in peripheral blood flow regulation in response to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) between individuals with and without DS

Methods: Participants (n = 10 males with DS and n = 11 male controls, mean age 23.7 years ± 3.2) underwent 5 min of LBNP stimulations (−20 mmHg), after resting supine for 10 min. One minute steady state blood pressure and blood flow at baseline and during LBNP were obtained for analysis. Mean flow velocity and arterial diameters were recorded with ultrasonography; foreram blood flow (FBF), shear rate and forearm vascular conductance (FVC) were calculated using brachial blood pressure measured right before ultrasound recordings

Results: Participants with DS responded differently (consistent with reduced vasoconstrictive control) to the LBNP stimulus (significant ConditionxGroup interaction effect) for mean velocity (p = 0.02), FBF (p = 0.04), shear rate (p = 0.02) and FVC (p = 0.03), compared to participants without DS.

Conclusion: Young males with DS exhibit reduced peripheral blood flow regulation in response to LBNP compared to controls, indicating a blunted sympathetic control of blood flow. Further research is necessary to explore the impact of these findings on exercise and work capacity.

Copyright
© 2018 Association for Research into Arterial Structure and Physiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC license.

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Journal
Artery Research
Volume-Issue
24 - C
Pages
16 - 21
Publication Date
2018/10
ISSN (Online)
1876-4401
ISSN (Print)
1872-9312
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2018.10.001How to use a DOI?
Copyright
© 2018 Association for Research into Arterial Structure and Physiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC license.

Cite this article

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Thessa I.M. Hilgenkamp
AU  - Sang Ouk Wee
AU  - Elizabeth C. Schroeder
AU  - Tracy Baynard
AU  - Bo Fernhall
PY  - 2018
DA  - 2018/10
TI  - Peripheral blood flow regulation in response to sympathetic stimulation in individuals with down syndrome
JO  - Artery Research
SP  - 16
EP  - 21
VL  - 24
IS  - C
SN  - 1876-4401
UR  - https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2018.10.001
DO  - https://doi.org/10.1016/j.artres.2018.10.001
ID  - Hilgenkamp2018
ER  -