Proceedings of the First International Conference on Social Science, Humanity, and Public Health (ICOSHIP 2020)

Medicolegal Bioethics Study Regarding Refusal of Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation Stated in the Do-Not-Resuscitate Form

Authors
Rano Indradi Sudra, Eni Mahawati
Corresponding Author
Rano Indradi Sudra
Available Online 2 January 2021.
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2991/assehr.k.210101.047How to use a DOI?
Keywords
do-not-resuscitate, medical record, euthanasia, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, death
Abstract
One form of medical action that the patient has the potential to refuse is cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). If a patient has the right to refuse CPR, does this mean that the statement “Do-Not-Resuscitate” (DNR) is the same as euthanasia? This is an empiric juridical research and aims to identify regulations related to patient DNR consent as a form of refusal to CPR. The DNR still requires a more in-depth study of various related aspects, including (but not limited to) legal, religious, social, culture, medical, technology, and bioethics. The understanding related to “death” and its relation to human rights to live and determine their life is also a consideration in thinking about DNR regarding this CPR. Aspects of communication and documentation of DNR results against CPR (if so decided) also need to be carefully planned.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC license.

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Cite this article

TY  - CONF
AU  - Rano Indradi Sudra
AU  - Eni Mahawati
PY  - 2021
DA  - 2021/01/02
TI  - Medicolegal Bioethics Study Regarding Refusal of Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation Stated in the Do-Not-Resuscitate Form
BT  - Proceedings of the First International Conference on Social Science, Humanity, and Public Health (ICOSHIP 2020)
PB  - Atlantis Press
SP  - 216
EP  - 219
SN  - 2352-5398
UR  - https://doi.org/10.2991/assehr.k.210101.047
DO  - https://doi.org/10.2991/assehr.k.210101.047
ID  - Sudra2021
ER  -